This Pride Month We Go Back in Time And See How Far Art Has Led The LGBTQ Community With Pride!

The only thing that speaks even after being speechless is Art – it doesn’t need a pitch, voice, or words; the only thing that art needs is your mindset. Artists are one of the most free[1]minded and communicative people in the world. They do not only speak with their mouth but also speak with their mind. Just to connect with the audience by respecting their art, an artist can go limitless. As we enter the sphere of Pride month, we are going to see the connection between two things – art and the LGBTQ community. You might just think that they don’t have any connection but after reading this, we are sure that this comprehension would be the only thing you need this Pride Month!

lgbtq

Claude Cahun made a not-so-common attempt of raising his voice and questioning gender specifications.

THE ERA OF EARLY 1900S

The 1900s was the time when the world was at peace. Everything was usual and nobody knew what being in a war is. Although the early 1900s was an important era because World War 1 was set to take place very soon, Art was not so prominent way of expressing yourself back then.

\Artists focused on real-life paintings and portraits of people with high authority that could afford such expenses. In 1928, a French writer and self-portraitist – Claude Cahun made a not-so-common attempt of raising his voice and questioning gender specifications.

The love of the same sex was considered a taboo at that time. “Masculine? Feminine? It depends on the situation. Neutral is the only gender that always suits me.” Was his famous line from his self-autobiography “Disavowals”. Everyone was amazed at such an attempt yet Claude opened the doors for what was about to come – a revolution.

lgbtq

While love among the same sex was illegal back then, Robert Rauschenberg made it to the headlines with the art he portrayed.

POST-WORLD WARS IN THE 1950S

The 1950s bought a lot of changes with it. You can honour the conclusion of World War II or hold the population boom responsible but this era was the most prominent and constituted for the high recovery of economies post-war.

While love among the same sex was illegal back then – one of the most celebrated and unique artists of the time – Robert Rauschenberg – made it to the headlines with the art he portrayed.

Just because it was against the law, Robert indirectly raised his voice and portrayed queerness through his abstract style. He included encoded paintings like Rebus, which required some visual understanding. You just need to connect the dots. Tell us what you think about this painting, let’s see how good of a decoder you are.

lgbtq

The Ballad of Sexual Dependency was one of Nan Goldin’s series in which she avidly shows various LGBTQ personalities in her excursion from America to Europe.

THE GOLDEN ERA OF THE 1990S

If we talk about the 90s, it has been a rather interesting era for every sector and industry. One of the most important decades which helped eminently in revolutionising the world. Some people also call the 90s “The best decade”.

During this best decade, LGBTQ was also thriving. They were fighting for recognition and identity throughout the world. While some of them did get justice, most of the people from the LGBTQ community were seen as if they were aliens.

Nan Goldin was a renowned photographer who fought for many causes like the HIV AIDS crisis and the Opioid epidemic in the 1970s and the 80s. The Ballad of Sexual Dependency was one of her series in which she avidly shows various LGBTQ personalities in her excursion from America to Europe. Many people opposed her idea of showing the reality through her lenses but within the LGBTQ community, she was no less than their active voice that represents culture.

lgbtq

Jimmy Ong raised his voice through his artistry. He is gay and mostly shares his experience through his contemporary art.

WELCOMING THE GEN-Z IN THE 21ST CENTURY

With the arrival of the 21st century, a major technological revolution was initiated within nations. Trade now feared no borders and international organisations were thriving amongst the others. Topics like gay marriage, gay adoptions, and LGBTQ rights were in the limelight and a bright light of hope entered the sphere.

Of the 195 countries – 29 have legalised gay marriages and have happily accepted the LGBTQ+ community. While all this was going on, an active Singaporean artist, Jimmy Ong raised his voice through his artistry. He is gay and mostly shares his experience through his contemporary art.

Hailing from the Asian community, he displays what being gay is like in the Chinese culture. This picture created a buzz in the international LGBTQ community and very importantly – the Asian Queer community; where the portrayal of being gay is still considered a big No. This painting was known as “Heart Daughters” and creates a mythological scenario.

%d bloggers like this: