Alongside being a dazzling fashion icon, Daniela Tablante also sparkles as a Media personality who demands justice for all. With a master’s degree in mass communication, she aims at becoming a perfect example for thousands by breaking the set barriers and striving for a future above the ordinary. From walking the shows like Miami Swim Week and New York Fashion Week to doing fieldwork as a journalist, her breath-taking looks and spirited personality have left us awestruck and continues to do so.

You have majorly worked in Hispanic media. Why is that so?

When I decided to leave my family in Europe to pursue my career in America, I was hoping to make it to a major English-speaking network one day. I interviewed for several big English-speaking networks like Fox in New York City but, after studying in the United States, I became more aware of all the issues that the Hispanic community faces in North America, especially new immigrants. I was very touched, and I felt like it was my obligation to get involved with the Latino community here.

Why did you opt for two graduations in the same field of Mass Communication?

I love learning and working with traditional media, but the world is constantly changing and so is the field of communications and media business in general. My degrees in Mass Communications gave me the resources that I needed to be able to work and produce television, news packages, or even my documentary. It also gave me the knowledge to be able to adapt to the new forms of Mass Communications which are digital platforms and social media. I never thought that I was going to find myself making more money with social media than with traditional media. I am glad I went to college during the time of this transition, and I was able to learn about social media and be aware of the positive and negative ways that it is impacting our society and how it is changing the way we think, communicate, socialize and interact with each other. I am also glad for all the research I was able to do during this transition time while I was doing my major and master’s degree in the United States.

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When I decided to leave my family in Europe to pursue my career in America, I was hoping to make it to a major English-speaking network one day.

How did you get associated with the climate change issue? What did you explore as a journalist striving for environmental subjects?

The reason why I am a big advocate for traditional education revolves around all the studies and research that I was able to get involved in while I was in the university, especially during my postgraduate degree. This experience gave me the opportunity to learn and get involved on issues that are very important to address as a society now. While I was doing my masters at Florida International University, I worked in the communications research department, and I was involved in environmental studies like the rise of the sea level in the state of Florida, climate change, and the viruses that were affecting our community like the Zika at that time. Also, I worked a lot on the stigmas of mental health among the Latino community. I had to read a lot and do fieldwork. I am so glad I was able to contribute to these important investigations. Working on this changed my perspective on many social and environmental matters. Now, these issues are a priority in my life and even though I can be working on fashion or entertainment media, environmental subjects will always be on my mind. I am working hard so that one day, I can have my organization address at least some of the problems that are affecting our planet. 

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The reason why I am a big advocate for traditional education revolves around all the studies and research that I was able to get involved in while I was in the university, especially during my postgraduate degree.

Kindly tell us about your Amazon Prime documentary Families Are Forever, Parkland Strong. How did you come up with this idea?

Families Are Forever, Parkland Strong is the first documentary I produced, and it shows the psychological effects of the Mass Shooting that took place on Valentine’s Day in 2018 in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School of Parkland, Florida. 17 people died in this tragedy that could have been avoided. Another 17 were severely injured but, the psychological consequences will last a lifetime, and they will continue to manifest over the years to come. This was an independent project I produced on an issue that has always been one of my biggest concerns since I came to the United States: Gun Violence. I directed and edited it myself. I always wanted to do more than just a short story for the news or an article, and I wanted to try a documentary. One of the teachers during my master’s in FIU was my biggest support and inspiration for this documentary.

You have worked in various media organizations. Kindly tell us the most memorable media project you were on and its effect on the community.

One of the stories that will always be in my heart and my mind is another gun violence tragedy that occurred in Orlando, just 8 minutes from where I used to live in the downtown of the city. I got to cover this story when I was working in the news at Univision. It was the Pulse Nightclub Shooting, where 49 people died and another 53 were wounded. The only positive that I got out of this horrifying experience was to see the whole community of Orlando coming together as a family to overcome this catastrophe. It made me want to get more involved in these types of stories until the policies that allowed this to happen actually change.

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Families Are Forever, Parkland Strong is the first documentary I produced, and it shows the psychological effects of the Mass Shooting that took place on Valentines Day in 2018 in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School of Parkland, Florida.

Kindly share the goals of your career as a producer and media personality and what it entails for the public? 

My goal is to create media content that inspires change in people’s lives. I want to get the public to think about these issues and turn their curiosity on, which will make them do their own research and find ways to contribute to policy transformations for a safer world, equal society, and a cleaner planet.

How did the shift from reporting to modeling happen?

I would not consider my work as a model or even as an actress a shift. I always loved the media and entertainment business in all its shapes and forms. Fashion has always been my passion, and I finally got the chance to work on it when I moved to Miami. Now, I have made deals with brands and I have walked in shows like Miami Swim Week and New York Fashion Week. It feels good to be able to do something that I love and consider a form of art while I am still working on issues that are affecting my community. I see both sides of my career as a compliment that makes my life more balanced as I get to work and have fun with entertainment and fashion, and I get involved in social issues at the same time.

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I would not consider my work as a model or even as an actress a shift.

How would you define your taste in fashion having worked with brands and strutting on esteemed runways?

Definitely, my taste in fashion has evolved a lot after working and walking for fashion brands. I have always loved to dress up, but I used to be more classy and less sassy when it came to style and dressing. A lot of times, you do not get to pick what you will be wearing when you are modeling. The designer or the fashion stylist dresses you, and you just have to learn how to rock it, even when you feel like it is not your style.

You have a sizzling body. What fitness regime do you follow?

Honestly, I do not go too hard when it comes to fitness and dieting. I love eating fresh and clean meals, and I am always coming up with new ways to eat healthy but still delicious. I like to create my healthy version of my favorite recipes and I always try to make new sugar-free, low-carb desserts. When it comes to fitness, I like to train between 3 to 5 times a week but I do not go crazy if I do not have time to work out one day. I try to keep a balance and enjoy life to the fullest. On the weekends, I am flexible, and I like to eat outside or have a drink.

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Honestly, I do not go too hard when it comes to fitness and dieting. I love eating fresh and clean meals, and I am always coming up with new ways to eat healthy but still delicious.

Has your perception of beauty changed or evolved after working in the glamour industry?

Yes, for sure. The more I worked in the beauty and glamour industry, the more I learned to appreciate natural beauty. Natural beauty is rare and unique, and I am happy that it is more acknowledged every time. I was born in Venezuela and in my culture, a lot of girls are used to seeing their older relatives get surgeries at a young age. I have learned to love myself and work on my body in natural ways since I started modeling and working with high fashion.

What are your future plans or dreams yet to be achieved?

My plan for this year is to keep growing my career. I am working on a few film production projects that I cannot reveal yet, but I am very excited as my career has just started, and I can see that the best is yet to come. I want to be an inspiration to many young Latinas who are doubting themselves or who are struggling right now in the United States. I want to prove to them that getting an education to pursue their careers is totally worth it and that we all can achieve our goals as long as we work hard and prepare for them.

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Natural beauty is rare and unique, and I am happy that it is more acknowledged every time.

What would you say to other young girls who are starting in the fashion or media industry? Who do you want to dedicate this cover to?

I will tell them to work extra hard on their goals, even if they seem to be unreachable or impossible at that moment. I will never forget how many designers or agencies rejected me for not fitting their traditional standards but, even though I felt bad at that moment, I overcame my frustration and I used it as fuel to work harder and keep pushing until I proved to them that shorter or curvier girls can look just as beautiful on a runway. I will always be an advocate for inclusion and diversity, and the fashion industry needs more role figures that break these archaic molds. There is beauty in diversity!

I want to dedicate this cover to all the Latinos that have left a mark on the fashion and entertainment industry all over the world, from designers to models and media personalities. I know how hard it is to make an international name on this glamorous business coming from countries like ours, where high fashion is not a major industry or even a priority. I wanted to showcase the fine and unique taste of Latino designers on this cover and that is the reason why I did the impossible to reach out to ngel Sánchez or Giannina Azar who have been killing the game for years. I will always be thankful that they allowed me to grace this summer edition of L’Officiel with their stunning designs.

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I want to dedicate this cover to all the Latinos that have left a mark on the fashion and entertainment industry all over the world, from designers to models and media personalities.

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